Mother’s India Fragrances / Nagchampas / Agni, Amrita, Atma, Bhakti, Jyoti, Lila, Moksha

After being introduced to and living with Mother’s India Fragrances’ original five Nagchampas, I can’t imagine anyone wouldn’t have asked the question “How come there aren’t more of them?” After all the originals are a phenomenal quintet of nagchampas in an era where the form has mostly degenerated. Where so many companies have either eliminated or reduced the content of halmaddi in their products, often creating inferior recipes that only resemble the incenses they used to create, Mother’s have managed to continue a line that not only still contains the ingredient (also called mattipal) but considerably expands the art form.

That is, when nagchampas were made 15 years ago or earlier, the incenses were so full of the gum that the sticks remained so wet you could easily pull them apart. The Mother’s Nagchampas don’t aim for a similar effect and while the incenses are still quite damp, often visibly through the inner packagaing, they all have a uniform consistency that follows the original five scents to what is an incredible 14 new scents. And for those of you already well familiar with the original five, these are going to surprise and elate you as in most cases they have brought the form up to a new level of complexity. Almost all of these incenses have as many as five or six different oil or material sources not even counting the halmaddi/mattipal and honey base. The results are so impressive that it’s difficult to feel that even after sampling several sticks of them that the full story has been told.

I’d like to thank both the home company of Mother’s India Fragrances and their Dutch distribution company Wierook for not only making Olfactory Rescue Service aware of them, but by providing a bounty of gifts and samples in time for me to get some reviews out just before the products come to the United States (not to mention one of the most informative and descriptive English language documents I’ve ever seen for a line of incenses, something that strongly assisted my reviews). Where it was difficult to label only five incenses as the finest Nagchampa line available, now that the total is up to 19, there’s really no question that this is the top line of its format, with a fascinating and aromatically superior range that doesn’t stop to recreate any old recipes and instead uses superior essential oils and absolutes to create a wide range of impressive and intricate scents. This installment will cover the first half of these 14 new incenses with the second half to follow shortly.

The first of these incenses is Agni Nagchampa. Perhaps the most simple description is that this is more or less a musk nagchampa, but it’s far more complex than that. It’s essentially a French Musk sort of scent, which bears some comparison to Shroff’s incense of that name or even the old Blue Pearl Musk Champa, however we know from the description that the central musk scent is created from ambrette seeds. My experience with musks created this way is that they usually aren’t quite this sweet, so one has to look to the other ingredients to see how the bouquet is formed. Obviously the halmaddi and honey anchor this quite nicely at the base as they do for all of the incenses here, so it’s really the middle of the aroma where the magic is. The pivotal ingredient here is neroli or orange blossom oil, an aspect which is the first of many through these incenses that show an incredibly clever perfumery at work because it’s a scent that is mellow and doesn’t overpower while anchoring the musk to the base. The cedar seems to bring out the balsamic aspects to the scent more which both balances the neroli and ensures the fragrance doesn’t go over the top on its way out. Make no mistake, this is still a decadently rich and sweet incenses as any sweet musk would be, but you can almost feel the restraint nonetheless.

As rich and sweet as the Agni is, the cinnamon-laden Amrita Nagchampa is almost a study in contrasts. Even with the amazing halmaddi and honey base, the results are very dry and of this seven, this could be the most direct incense. The cinnamon is very beautifully drawn, in fact the description the company uses is “edible,” something easily understood with a sample. However the cinnamon does have its supporting actors, including patchouli, cedar and some unnamed woods and resins. There are some elements in this that remind me of Nippon Kodo’s Silk Road incense except with a much more genuine feel) but the comparison hints at an exotic subnote that really helps to transmute the base to support the overall dryness.

The Atma Nagchampa is also a restrained piece of work, but in this case it doesn’t transmit a single essence like the previous scent did, instead it portrays a balancing act with a number of different notes at work. What’s amazing about it is that even with so many players the composite aroma remains gentle and subtle. On top we have the dominant floral oils at work, some lavender and what seems like a closer mix of geranium and kewra (pandanus or screwpine) notes. But like several incenses among the new aromas, Mother’s have chosen to contrast these floral elements with a spicy backdrop (including clove), something the company is clearly adept at. The results are actually akin to a standard (if exceptional in quality) nag champa with a soft floral in touch. What it loses without a particularly aggressive bouquet, it gains with a gentle aura and since everything seems to work on such a subtle level, it’s one of the most difficult in this group to get a hang on. But by the last stick I had out it was really starting to get under my skin.

Bhakti Nagchampa is something of an instant classic. As mentioned with the previous incense, Bhakti goes for a floral spice mix that is extraordinary in that it seems possible to pick out the individual elements as they interact with each other. The rose/tuberose/geranium mix on the top could be the best among a number of incredible floral elements across all these incenses and this is perhaps because they not only have strong definition but they’re contrasted perfectly with the patchouli and cedar base. In fact the only question I have is whether a scent like this might lose some of this fantastic definition with aging, because the balance here is like a highwire act with all the base elements a stage for the florals to dance lightly over.

Jyoti Nagchampa has some similarities to the cinnamon heavy Amrita, but here the scent is less monochromatic and more of a tangier multi-spice blend. In fact, it seems likely some of its spicier attributes come from the mix of myrrh, vertivert and patchouli, a group of ingredients that all have great transmutational qualities in different blends. In fact any time Mother’s uses a larger amount of resins in its incenses, it seems to trigger the more balsamic and sometimes evergreen qualities of the base. The mix definitely leaves me very curious about the quality of benzoin used in the ingredients as I recognize none of the usual subnotes and a quality that is truly exquisite. Again this mosaic (which also pulls in kewra to a slight degree) really hits a great balance with a vanilla and spice presence that is just perfect.

Lila Nagchampa is a patchouli heavy incense whose other ingredients really shift the whole tonal balance you normally associate with the herb in new and fascinating ways. For one, this is an incense as sweet as the Agni or Moksha blends, something particularly unusual for something so prevalent with patchouli. Sharing the stage with the patchouli on the top is tuberose, which has already shown its effectiveness in the Bhakti, but where that incense contrasted the floral and spicy, the Lila goes for the composite approach, like a rainbow color chart changing from one end of the spectrum to the other. Undoubtedly the vetivert changes the patchouli element some, always a great partnering, but perhaps where the benzoin and oakmoss lies is where the true transmutation occurs as it falls into the sweet base. The informational material also calls chocolate as a note as a result of the benzoin and you indeed find a powdery cocoa-like subnote in the mix of all this interaction. Like so many of these beautiful scents this seems like one that will have a learning curve as long as the best incenses because it’s not at all what you’d expect in the long run. It’s better.

Moksha Nagchampa …. well if you think it couldn’t get any better than what I’ve already run through then we’d have to at least call this a gamechanger. Champa users may be familiar with a lot of the intersections between style and addition, but the incredibly lily of the valley scent (muguet) that crowns the Moksha is positively ecstatic. And Mother’s doesn’t shy from the contrasts here either, setting off on a trail of oriental woods and saffron notes that end up creating a very rich depth before giving one a floral shock that starts with the rose notes, part of which are described as “citrusy rose petals” which seem to be what I’m picking up as a slight melon-like fruitiness. It all results in the most incredible, kaleidoscopic aroma that has the feminine, floral notes of so many modern perfumes but with the depth of the traditional. I’ve had a few incenses with lily of the valley in them, but none quite so stunning as this one.

One thing you’d expect from a great company is that in expanding what was a really impressive quintet, Mother’s haven’t sat on their laurels and tried to spin similar variations off of an already established success, they’ve possibly surpassed them, or if not, they’ve added such an incredible amount of variation to their line that it breathes new life into the whole line and makes you want to go back to the original quintet for reevaluation. With each stick I became far more deeply involved with each one to the point that picking a favorite is very difficult, there’s really not a blend here I wouldn’t want consistent stock on. There’s just no question that this is the crowning line of the modern nagchampa and I’m fortunate to be able to bring seven more to your attention in the next installment.

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19 Comments

  1. KeesKoh said,

    March 18, 2011 at 1:51 am

    How did the India line turned out? Any favorite? I like the Moksha very much.

  2. Tara Riley said,

    October 17, 2010 at 11:13 am

    Hello! Just wanted to let you all know there’s a Facebook product and Fan Page for active participation in our wonderful fragrances! We look forward to all of your comments and suggestions! ~~

  3. August 31, 2010 at 10:54 am

    […] (Cinnamon Clove Nutmeg etc.), Tuberose, Vanilla, Vetivert / Khus, Woods, Ylang Ylang) Since the last installment on the newly released Mother’s Fragrances Nagchampa incenses, the company kindly sent me what […]

  4. Masha said,

    August 26, 2010 at 8:47 am

    I was wondering if anyone’s tried the Mother’s cones? I like Ganesh very much, but still can’t stand the smell of burning bamboo cores. I may try the cones to see if that takes care of the problem.

  5. Mike said,

    August 24, 2010 at 11:22 am

    http://merecie.com/Mothers%20Nagchampa%20Incense.htm

    This company in California is already offering the incenses for sale. They are, however, listing 12 and 24 stick packages, and I think they’re actually 10 and 20, so I’m not sure what the discrepancy is here.

  6. Alan said,

    August 24, 2010 at 12:25 am

    I’ve wondered where the Nag Champa flower fits into this picture.
    Have you checked out this blog ?
    Google..ayalasmellyblog.blogspot.com/2007/06/champaca-flowers-vs-
    nag-champa-incense.html

    • glennjf said,

      August 24, 2010 at 12:47 am

      Thanks Alan. Here is a direct link to the blog post.

      http://ayalasmellyblog.blogspot.com/2007/06/champaca-flowers-vs-nag-champa-incense.html

      • Alan said,

        August 24, 2010 at 11:20 am

        Thanks Glenn..My computer skills are limited.
        [ insert emoticon ]

    • Mike said,

      August 24, 2010 at 8:33 am

      That blog entry is obviously a bit more concerned with the perfume side, but the same points the author makes in regards to the expense of using champaca oil could also be applied to the use of halmaddi. Most champas contain neither. However all the Mother’s incenses do contain halmaddi and I wouldn’t be surprised if a few of them use some form of champaca absolute in small quantities as in several of the incenses the flower is mentioned specifically as “golden champa” or the latin name. Is that what you were asking?

      • Alan said,

        August 24, 2010 at 11:17 am

        Thanks Mike. So it seems the “nag” prefix is more a style or trade
        handle than a main attraction or coveted ingredient.
        I’ve learned a lot from ORS.

  7. zombiefilmfan said,

    August 20, 2010 at 6:35 am

    I am going to buying some Ganesh today. I love Ananda and Vishnu so far, and I cant wait for the sweetness of the Ganesh. I am sure I will love the new line up as well. I can’t wait for them to become available to purchase.

    • Mike said,

      August 20, 2010 at 9:11 am

      Although I suspect at least Essence will have these in stock probably by the next monthly update, Wierook in the Netherlands does have these in stock already, although at the moment they only have a Dutch webshop. They are setting one up in English. But I can imagine something might be arranged if anyone contacts them directly since they’re set up for paypal.

      • danothy said,

        August 21, 2010 at 12:55 am

        I’ve ordered from Wierook in the Netherlands and I can highly recommend it. The website was already set up to ship to Germany (where I live), so I don’t know how it would be to ship to other parts of the world. It’s a little difficult to negotiate the website if you can’t make sense of Dutch, but it’s worth the effort. I’ve just noticed, though, the a couple of the scents that are in the Nag Champa sampler are not (yet, I hope) available separately. And unfortunately it’s a couple that I’m really partial to (Lila and Om). So I’ll be waiting too.
        Wonderful reviews above, by the way!

  8. Laurie said,

    August 20, 2010 at 1:21 am

    Oooh, so mattipal IS halmaddi. That clarifies things.

    Omg, I cannot wait for these to come out.

    • glennjf said,

      August 20, 2010 at 3:22 am

      It’s amazing, just when I’d resigned myself to thinking I’d never ever have the opportunity to try halmaddi based incenses they’re back and then some.

  9. Hamid said,

    August 20, 2010 at 12:26 am

    Thanks Mike…I am eager to try the newbies…

  10. robin-m said,

    August 19, 2010 at 6:53 pm

    Am burning Ganesh tonight — can’t wait to meet his new siblings! Thanks, Mike, for the excellent review.

  11. Ross Urrere said,

    August 19, 2010 at 5:42 pm

    I have a feeling that these will be real blockbusters, pretty exciting and gutsy at the same time. Thanks Mike

  12. Cliff said,

    August 19, 2010 at 5:09 pm

    Very exciting news. I just received more Ganesh and Shanti Champas in the mail today. Can’t wait to try some of these new varieties.


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